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Sinapis alba

AuthorityL.
FamilyMagnoliopsida:Dilleniidae:Capparales:Cruciferae
SynonymsBrassica alba (L.)Rabenh., Brassica hirta Moench
Common nameswhite mustard, English mustard, mustard seed, mostaza, moutarde, Senfsaat, senap, sennep, khardal, mosterd, senape, mastarda, gorshitsa, shiro-karashi, chieh, Sinapis albae semen, Brassica nigrae semen, Oleum sinapi, Brassica junceae semen
Editor
Ecocrop code9787



Notes
BRIEF DESCRIPTION A tall herb reaching a height of 30-100 cm. The root is a thin taproot, sparsely branching, the stem is cylindrical, and the leaves are deeply lobed pinnate, and petioled. The flowers are yellow and the fruit is a hairy siliquae, 2-8 cm long, with 3-7 seeds. USES It can be grown for grazing or green manure. It can be grown in boxes and be cut 6 days from sowing for salad. The seeds are used as spice and yields 30% mustard oil. The oil is used as food, lubricant and illumination, and it also has medicinal properties. The plant is a good honey producer, yielding up to 40 kg/ha. GROWING PERIOD Annual. COMMON NAMES White mustard, English mustard. FURTHER INF Scientific synonyms: Brassica alba, B. hirta. White mustard is native of the Mediterranean region and western Asia. It is not commonly grown in the tropics. A dry season after the emergence of fruits will hamper the development of seeds, thus causing severe loss of yield. The expected yield is 0.5-1.2 t/ha. Mustard should not be sown in the same field within two years.
Sources
SOURCES (S. alba L.)
Hackett C 1982 pp 45 [FER, PHO, DEP, PH, TEXT, TEMP]
Duke J 1975 pp 27 [PH, RAIN, TEMP]
Tindall H 1983 pp 138 [USE]
Roecklein J 1987 pp 192 [USE]
Purseglove J 1974 pp 91 [USE]
Hornok L 1992 pp 232-235 [TEMP, RAIN, KTMP, TEXT, FER, PH, USE]